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August 22, 2013 - Treasury Targets Front Operations Working on Behalf of Sinaloa Cartel Drug Lord “El Azul”

Action Exposes Attempts by Sinaloa Leader to Evade Sanctions - The U.S. Department of the Treasury today announced the designation of five Mexican individuals linked to Juan Jose Esparragoza Moreno (a.k.a. El Azul), a leader of Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel. In addition, the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) published the new aliases of seven previously designated companies, which operate gas stations, with links with Esparragoza Moreno.

"We will continue to target companies and individuals that support the networks of Esparragoza Moreno, his criminal associate Rafael Caro Quintero, and other leaders of the Sinaloa Cartel. We will take the necessary action to protect the U.S. financial system from their illicit proceeds and we will ensure that their attempts to evade sanctions will not succeed," said OFAC Director Adam J. Szubin.

On July 24, 2012, OFAC designated seven companies based in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico because they are owned or controlled by individuals who act on behalf of Esparragoza Moreno, including his wife, Ofelia Monzon Araujo, who was also designated on the same date. Today's action targeted the following five individuals for their official roles in these gas stations: Angello de Jesus Solis Aviles, Mario Parra Sanchez, Manuel Arturo Valdez Rodriguez, Juan Carlos Villegas Loera, and Vanessa Valenzuela Valenzuela. These individuals are managing these companies on behalf of Esparragoza Moreno and his network and, in an attempt to evade sanctions, have renamed the companies as follows: <sort> Combuservicios Los Tres Rios, S.A. de C.V. (previously Estaciones de Servicios Canarias, S.A. de C.V.); Gasolinera El Crucero Las Torres, S.A. de C.V. (previously Servicios Chulavista, S.A. de C.V.); Gasolinera La Canada, S.A. de C.V. (previously Gasodiesel y Servicios Ancona, S.A. de C.V.); Gasolineras La Villa, S.A. de C.V. (previously Gasolinera y Servicios Villabonita, S.A. de C.V.); Gasolinera Multilomas, S.A. de C.V. (previously Buenos Aires Servicios, S.A. de C.V.); Gasolinera Recursos Hidraulicos, S.A. de C.V. (previously Gasolinera Alamos Country, S.A. de C.V.) Servicios y Gasolineras Barrancos, S.A. de C.V. (previously Petrobarrancos, S.A. de C.V.) </sort> The President identified Esparragoza Moreno and the Sinaloa Cartel as significant foreign narcotics traffickers pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act), in 2003 and 2009, respectively. Esparragoza Moreno has been active in drug trafficking since the late 1970s when he and others, including Rafael Caro Quintero, formed the Guadalajara drug cartel. Rafael Caro Quintero was also identified as a significant foreign narcotics trafficker pursuant to the Kingpin Act in 2000. Esparragoza Moreno was indicted on drug trafficking charges in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas in 2003. He is wanted in both the U.S. and Mexico. The U.S. State Department Narcotics Rewards Program is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading to Esparragoza Moreno's arrest and/or conviction, while Mexican authorities are offering 30 million pesos for information leading to his capture.

Today's action, pursuant to the Kingpin Act, generally prohibits U.S. persons from conducting financial or commercial transactions with these designees, and also freezes any assets they may have under U.S. jurisdiction.

Internationally, OFAC has designated more than 1,300 businesses and individuals linked to 103 drug kingpins since June 2000. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals could face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act.

For a chart relating to today's actions click here - Department of the Treasury Press Release


August 01, 2013 - Treasury Designates Family Members and Accomplices of Los Zetas Boss Omar Trevino Morales - Action Targets Wife and Father-in-Law for Money Laundering Activities

The U.S. Department of the Treasury today designated Jesus Fernandez de Luna and his cattle sales company Compania Ganadera 5 Manantiales. Mexican national Jesus Fernandez de Luna engages in drug trafficking activities for the violent drug cartel Los Zetas, the recently-arrested Miguel Trevino Morales, and his brother Omar Trevino Morales. Los Zetas leaders Miguel and Omar Trevino Morales have used proceeds from their involvement in the narcotics trade to purchase American quarter horses, and launder the money through Jesus Fernandez de Luna and his cattle business. Mexican authorities arrested Miguel Trevino Morales on July 15, 2013.

“Omar Trevino Morales’s wife and father-in-law have been involved in money laundering activities on behalf of the notoriously violent Los Zetas. As we work to support our Mexican partners, we will continue to target anyone involved in these activities, including family members of cartel bosses who provide essential support to these violent narcotics organizations,” said Treasury’s Director of the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) Adam J. Szubin.

Today’s action, taken pursuant to the Kingpin Act, generally prohibits U.S. persons from engaging in any transactions with these designees and freezes any assets they may have under U.S. jurisdiction.

Omar Trevino Morales established Compania Ganadera 5 Manantiales as a money laundering front for his wife, Carolina Fernandez Gonzalez, and her father, Jesus Fernandez de Luna. Shareholders include Jesus Fernandez de Luna and his wife, Esperanza Maria Gonzalez Muniz, and its principal officers, shareholders, and original incorporators include Jesus Fernandez de Luna, his brother, Gerardo Fernandez de Luna, and his brother-in-law, Emilio Guillermo Gonzalez Muniz.

Jesus Fernandez de Luna is wanted in the Western District of Texas (Austin Division) for conspiring to conceal or disguise drug proceeds for Miguel and Omar Trevino Morales. In September 2012, Jesus Fernandez de Luna purchased four valuable racehorses for Miguel and Omar Trevino Morales through Compania Ganadera 5 Manantiales. The U.S. Government seized and sold these horses at auction. Additionally, in 2001, the Western District of Texas (Del Rio Division) indicted Jesus Fernandez de Luna, and his brother Gerardo Fernandez de Luna, along with Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman Loera, on narcotics trafficking charges.

The President identified Los Zetas as a significant foreign narcotics trafficker pursuant to the Kingpin Act in April 2009, and on July 24, 2011, he named Los Zetas as a significant Transnational Criminal Organization in the Annex to Executive Order 13581 (Blocking Property of Transnational Criminal Organizations). OFAC designated Los Zetas leaders Miguel and Omar Trevino Morales on July 20, 2009 and March 24, 2010, respectively.

Today’s action is OFAC’s third designation targeting Los Zetas in the last three months. In July 2013, OFAC designated two key financial operators for Los Zetas, and in May 2013, OFAC designated a major narcotics trafficker responsible for smuggling multiple tons of marijuana and cocaine, monthly, from Mexico to the U.S. for Miguel Trevino Morales and Omar Trevino Morales.

Additionally, last year OFAC designated Los Zetas front man Francisco Colorado Cessa and his company ADT Petroservicios for laundering millions of dollars of drug proceeds through the American quarter-horse racing and breeding industry for Miguel and Omar Trevino Morales. The U.S. Government has seized and auctioned hundreds of horses worth millions of dollars as part of an investigation of Los Zetas money laundering operations. In May 2013, Francisco Colorado Cessa was convicted of charges related to money laundering in U.S. District Court Western District of Texas (Austin Division).

Today’s action would not be possible without the support and cooperation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Government of Mexico.

Internationally, OFAC has designated more than 1,300 individuals and entities linked to 103 drug kingpins since June 2000. OFAC designations are part of an ongoing effort to apply financial measures against significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations worldwide. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act.

For a chart relating to today’s actions click here.


May 31, 2013 - OFAC Kingpin Act Designations <sort> KARNER, Mihael (a.k.a. TOPOLOVEC, Jozef), Locnikarijeva ulica 7, 1000, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Rozna Dolina, Cesta IV 44, Ljubljana, Slovenia; V Murglah 177, Ljubljana, Slovenia; DOB 13 Mar 1975; POB Ljubljana, Slovenia; nationality Slovenia; Passport PZ2420022110 (Slovenia); alt. Passport PB06005902 (Slovenia); Personal ID Card 00246412491303975500493 (Slovenia) expires 17 Dec 2018; alt. Personal ID Card 002464124 (Slovenia) expires 17 Dec 2018 (individual) [SDNTK]. NOORZAI, Haji Kotwal (a.k.a. "KHOOTWAL, Haji"; a.k.a. "KHOTWAL, Haji"; a.k.a. "KOOTWAL, Haji"), Quetta City, Balochistan Province, Pakistan; Girdi Jangle, Balochistan Province, Pakistan; DOB 1961; alt. DOB 1960; alt. DOB 1962; alt. DOB 1958; alt. DOB 1957; alt. DOB 1959; POB Nahr-e Saraj Village, Nahr-e Saraj District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan; nationality Afghanistan (individual) [SDNTK]. SANCHEZ ARELLANO, Luis Fernando; DOB 24 Oct 1973; POB Baja California, Mexico; nationality Mexico; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. LOS CABALLEROS TEMPLARIOS, Mexico [SDNTK]. LOS CACHIROS, Honduras [SDNTK]. LOS URABENOS (a.k.a. BANDA CRIMINAL DE URABA; a.k.a. LOS AUTODEFENSAS GAITANISTAS DE COLOMBIA), Colombia; Honduras; Panama [SDNTK]. </sort> OFAC Recent Actions


May 14, 2013 - OFAC Kingpin Act Designations

The following individual has been added to OFAC's SDN List:

OFAC Recent Actions


May 07, 2013 - OFAC Kingpin Act Designations

The Obama administration has levied financial sanctions again eight drug gang bosses accused of working for Mexico's powerful and violent Sinaloa Cartel.The government accused the eight regional bosses of managing drug smuggling operations for Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the purported head of the Sinaloa Cartel, the Treasury Department announced Tuesday. By declaring the men specially designated narcotics traffickers under the Kingpin Act, Washington has made it illegal for U.S. citizens to do business with them and freezes any assets they may have inside the U.S. Source: Ledger Enquirer News Item

The following individuals have been added to OFAC's SDN List: <sort> FLORES PACHECO, Cenobio (a.k.a. CASTRO VILLA, Luis Fernando; a.k.a. "CHECO"; a.k.a. "CHEKO"); DOB 13 Nov 1974; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. LOPEZ AISPURO, Armando; DOB 27 Oct 1969; POB Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. NIEBLAS NAVA, Guillermo (a.k.a. NIEBLA GONZALEZ, Adelmo; a.k.a. "EL M"; a.k.a. "EL MEMO"); DOB 21 Dec 1958; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. PAEZ SOTO, Ramon Ignacio (a.k.a. "EL MORENO"; a.k.a. "PAEZ Nachillo"; a.k.a. "PAEZ, Nacho"); DOB 31 Jul 1973; POB Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. RASCON RAMIREZ, Jose Javier (a.k.a. "EL KHADAFI"); DOB 24 Jul 1966; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. SABORI CISNEROS, Raul (a.k.a. "EL NEGRO"); DOB 07 Jul 1963; POB Baja California Norte, Mexico; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. SALAZAR RAMIREZ, Jesus Alfredo (a.k.a. "INDIO"; a.k.a. "MUNE"); DOB 24 Mar 1974; POB Chihuahua, Mexico; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. SOSA CANISALES, Felipe de Jesus (a.k.a. "EL GIGIO"; a.k.a. "GIO"); DOB 16 Jul 1968; citizen Mexico (individual) [SDNTK]. </sort> OFAC Recent Actions


January 30, 2013 - Kingpin Act Designations​; Kingpin Act Designations​ Removals; Counter Narcotics Designation Removals

Specially Designated Nationals List Update

The following individual has been added to OFAC's SDN List:

The following entity has been added to OFAC's SDN List:

The following deletions have been made to OFAC's SDN List:

OFAC Recent Actions


January 17, 2013 - Kingpin Act Designations

The following individuals have been added to OFAC's SDN List: <sort> CHAN INZUNA, Araceli; DOB 08 Feb 1985; nationality Mexico; Passport 03040074084 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK]. FLORES APODACA, Angelina; DOB 21 Jul 1958; Passport 040068785 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK]. FLORES APODACA, Augustin (a.k.a. "EL BARBON"; a.k.a. "EL INGENIERO"; a.k.a. "EL NINO"), Calle Sierra Madre Occidental No. 1280, Colonia Canadas, Culiacan, Sinaloa 8000, Mexico; DOB 09 Jun 1964; Passport 040070827 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK]. FLORES APODACA, Panfilo; DOB 01 Jun 1969; Passport G00527961 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK]. MEZA ANGULO, Fausto Isidro; DOB 27 Mar 1964; citizen Mexico; Passport 040059510 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK]. MEZA FLORES, Fausto Isidro (a.k.a. "ISIDRO, Chapito"; a.k.a. "ISIDRO, Chapo"); DOB 19 Jun 1982; POB Navojoa, Sinaloa, Mexico; nationality Mexico; Passport 07040028724 (Mexico); alt. Passport 03040026468 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK] (Linked To: AUTOTRANSPORTES TERRESTRES S.A. DE C.V.; Linked To: AUTO SERVICIO JATZIRY S.A. DE C.V.; Linked To: CONSTRUCTORA JATZIRY DE GUASAVE S.A. DE C.V.). MEZA FLORES, Flor Angely; DOB 20 Sep 1989; POB Guasave, Sinaloa, Mexico; nationality Mexico; Passport 040068790 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK]. MEZA FLORES, Salome (a.k.a. "FINO"; a.k.a. "PELON"); DOB 23 Oct 1962; nationality Mexico; Passport 07040059504 (Mexico) (individual) [SDNTK]. </sort> The following entities have been added to OFAC's SDN List: <sort> AUTO SERVICIO JATZIRY S.A. DE C.V., Guasave, Sinaloa, Mexico; Registration ID 12577 (Mexico) [SDNTK] (Linked To: MEZA FLORES, Fausto Isidro). AUTOTRANSPORTES TERRESTRES S.A. DE C.V., Guasave, Sinaloa, Mexico [SDNTK] (Linked To: MEZA FLORES, Fausto Isidro). CONSTRUCTORA JATZIRY DE GUASAVE S.A. DE C.V., Guasave, Sinaloa, Mexico; Registration ID 13554 [SDNTK] (Linked To: MEZA FLORES, Fausto Isidro). MEZA FLORES DRUG TRAFFICKING ORGANIZATION, Mexico [SDNTK]. </sort> OFAC Recent Actions


January 09, 2013 - Kingpin Act Designations

The following individuals have been added to OFAC's SDN List:


December 19, 2012 - Kingpin Act Designation Removals​; Anti-Narcotics Designations Removals

The following deletions have been made to OFAC's SDN List:

OFAC Recent Actions


December 12, 2012 - Kingpin Act Designations - Treasury Levies Additional Sanctions Against Business Network Linked to Sinaloa Cartel Drug Lord El Azul

The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) today announced the designation of one entity and three individuals linked to Juan Jose Esparragoza Moreno (a.k.a. El Azul), a leader of Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel.

Today’s action, pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act), prohibits U.S. persons from conducting financial or commercial transactions with these designees, and also freezes any assets they may have under U.S. jurisdiction.

“Since July, OFAC has exposed numerous entities in Esparragoza Moreno’s corporate network, including gas station companies and real estate development firms operating in the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Jalisco,” said OFAC Director Adam J. Szubin. “As we continue to target this organization, we expect to severely disrupt its operations.”

The President identified Esparragoza Moreno and the Sinaloa Cartel as significant foreign narcotics traffickers pursuant to the Kingpin Act in 2003 and 2009, respectively. Esparragoza Moreno was indicted on drug trafficking charges in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas in 2003. He is wanted in both the U.S. and Mexico. The U.S. State Department Narcotics Rewards Program is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading to Esparragoza Moreno’s arrest and/or conviction, while Mexican authorities are offering 30 million pesos for information leading to his capture. Esparragoza Moreno has been active in drug trafficking since the 1970s.

Today’s action targets Desarrollos Everest, S.A. de C.V., a real estate development company based in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico. This company is co-owned by Maria Guadalupe Gastelum Payan, a wife of Esparragoza Moreno who was previously designated because she acts on behalf of her husband. Also targeted today is Residencial del Lago, a residential community located in Culiacan owned or controlled by Desarrollos Everest, S.A. de C.V.

OFAC has also today designated Mexican individuals Jorge Enrique Esquerra Esquer, Julio Cesar Estrada Gutierrez, and Carlos Alberto Leon Santiesteban. Esquerra Esquer and Estrada Gutierrez both play important roles in the previously-designated Jalisco companies Grupo Cinjab, S.A. de C.V. (which manages the residential community Provenza Residencial) and Grupo Impergoza, S.A. de C.V. (which manages the Provenza Center shopping mall and the La Tijera Parque Industrial warehouse facility). Carlos Alberto Leon Santiesteban acts on behalf of the following six previously-designated Sinaloa gas station companies: Estaciones de Servicios Canarias, S.A. de C.V., Gasodiesel y Servicios Ancona, S.A. de C.V., Gasolinera Alamos Country, S.A. de C.V., Gasolinera y Servicios Villabonita, S.A. de C.V., Petrobarrancos, S.A. de C.V., and Servicios Chulavista, S.A. de C.V.

Today’s action would not have been possible without the support of the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Internationally, OFAC has designated more than 1,200 businesses and individuals linked to 97 drug kingpins since June 2000. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals could face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act.

US Department of the Treasury Press Release - to view a chart of the El Azul organization, cllick here


Kingpin Act Designation Removals; Counter Narcotics Designation Removals

Specially Designated Nationals Update

The following individuals have been added to OFAC's SDN List:

The following entity has been added to OFAC's SDN List:

OFAC Recent Actions


November 20, 2012 - Kingpin Act Designations

The following individuals have been added to OFAC's SDN List:

The following entities have been added to OFAC's SDN List:

OFAC Recent Actions


October 10, 2012 - Action Targets Two Additional Mexican Companies

The U.S. Department of the Treasury today designated two entities linked to Juan Jose Esparragoza Moreno (a.k.a. El Azul), a leader of Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel. Today’s action, pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act), prohibits U.S. persons from conducting financial or commercial transactions with these entities and individuals, and also freezes any assets they may have under U.S. jurisdiction.

“Today’s action serves as a reminder to Esparragoza Moreno that he and his organization remain in our sights,” said Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) Director Adam J. Szubin. “Numerous entities within the Mexican private sector have voluntarily severed ties with Esparragoza Moreno’s corporate network, helping to significantly disrupt and isolate this organization. However, it should be noted that any company or individual that continues to act on behalf of or support this network could become the target of sanctions.”

The President identified Esparragoza Moreno and the Sinaloa Cartel as significant foreign narcotics traffickers pursuant to the Kingpin Act in 2003 and 2009, respectively. Esparragoza Moreno was indicted on drug trafficking charges in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas in 2003. He is wanted in both the U.S. and Mexico. The U.S. State Department Narcotics Rewards Program is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading to Esparragoza Moreno’s arrest and/or conviction while Mexican authorities are offering 30 million pesos for information leading to his capture. Esparragoza Moreno has been active in drug trafficking since the 1970s.

Today’s action targets two Mexican entities.

The designation of these two entities follows a previous Treasury action targeting Esparragoza Moreno. On July 24, 2012, Treasury designated nine entities and ten individuals linked to Esparragoza Moreno. The entities include the Tlajomulco de Zuniga-based property management companies Grupo Cinjab, S.A. de C.V., which manages the aforementioned Provenza Residencial, and Grupo Impergoza, S.A. de C.V., which manages the Provenza Center shopping mall and the La Tijera Parque Industrial warehouse facility. Also designated on that day were seven gas station companies located in Culiacan, Sinaloa: Buenos Aires Servicios, S.A. de C.V., Estaciones de Servicios Canarias, S.A. de C.V., Gasodiesel y Servicios Ancona, S.A. de C.V., Gasolinera Alamos Country, S.A. de C.V., Gasolinera y Servicios Villabonita, S.A. de C.V., Petrobarrancos, S.A. de C.V., and Servicios Chulavista, S.A. de C.V.

Today’s action would not have been possible without the support of the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Internationally, Treasury has designated more than 1,100 businesses and individuals linked to 97 drug kingpins since June 2000. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals could face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act.

To view a chart of the Esparragoza Moreno Organization, see link & the Department of the Treasury Press Relase


September 25, 2012 - Kingpin Act Designations

​The following individuals have been added to OFAC's SDN List:

OFAC Recent Actions


September 06, 2012 - Kingpin Act Designation; Anti-Terrorism Designation Removal - Treasury Targets the Second Wife of Chapo Guzman

The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) today announced the designation of Griselda Lopez Perez, a wife of fugitive drug lord Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman Loera, who plays a key role in his drug trafficking organization. Today’s action, pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act), prohibits U.S. persons from conducting financial or commercial transactions with this individual, and also freezes any assets she may have under U.S. jurisdiction. “Today marks the third time in the past five months that OFAC has targeted family members who act on behalf of Chapo Guzman,” said OFAC Director Adam J. Szubin. “This action builds on Treasury’s aggressive efforts, alongside its law enforcement partners, to target individuals who facilitate Chapo Guzman’s drug trafficking operations.”

“DEA and its partners are attacking Chapo Guzman's drug trafficking operations at every level, using the law enforcement tools available to bring these criminals to justice,” said DEA Chief of Financial Operations John Arvanitis. “This is another strike against the brutal Sinaloa Cartel and Chapo's wife, who has served as a major criminal facilitator on his behalf.”

OFAC is designating Griselda Lopez Perez for her role in the operations of Guzman Loera’s drug trafficking organization, including her efforts to assist Guzman Loera in evading justice. Additionally, Griselda Lopez Perez provides material support to the drug trafficking activities of her husband. Guzman Loera was identified by the President as a significant foreign narcotics trafficker pursuant to the Kingpin Act in 2001.

Today’s action would not have been possible without the key support of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). The U.S. Customs and Border Protection also assisted with today’s action.

Internationally, OFAC has designated more than 1,100 businesses and individuals linked to 97 drug kingpins since June 2000. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals could face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act.

The following individual has been added to OFAC's SDN List:

OFAC Resource Center & OFAC Press Release

FinCen

September 30, 2013 - Update regarding activity associated with regulatory restrictions imposed on Mexican financial institutions for transactions in U.S. currency

Financial institutions should continue to consider previous advisories issued by FinCEN with respect to Mexico as well as information in the CNBV Advisory. As a result of the restrictions, illicit actors may utilize different methodologies, including use of financial institutions with higher dollar thresholds than Mexican banks or movement through other jurisdictions, to repatriate illicit proceeds. FinCEN continues to evaluate information on money laundering activities involving transnational criminal organizations operating in Mexico and the United States and will report, as appropriate, on emerging methods and schemes used to launder criminal proceeds.

If a financial institution knows, suspects, or has reason to sus pect that a transaction conducted or attempted by, at, or through the financial institution involv es funds derived from illegal activity or an attempt to disguise funds derived from illegal activity, is designed to evade regulations promulgated under the Bank Secrecy Act, or lacks a business or apparent lawful purpose, the financial institution may be required to file a SAR. 7 Financial institutions that receive or offer services in connection with bulk cash shipments and c orrespondent banking should have policies and procedures that mitigate the risks of those serv ices. While the transactional activity that U.S. financial institutions may experience as a result of the Mexican restrictions may not be indicative of criminal activity, U.S. financial institutions should consi der this activity in conjunction with other information, including transaction volumes and source(s) of funds, when determining whether to file a SAR.

Financial institutions should continue to be alert to the possi ble use of alternative methods to move funds linked to the laundering of criminal proceeds and to report that information as appropriate. Additionally, FinCEN continues to request financial institutions to include “MX Restriction” in the narrative portion of SARs to indicate a possible connection between the suspicious activity being reported and the enacted U.S. cur rency restrictions on Mexican financial institutions.

FinCen Guidance

Major drug-producing or drug-transit country

September 15, 2011 - Under the Foreign Relations Authorization Act (FAA), the President is required each year to notify Congress of those countries he determines to be major illicit drug-producing countries or major drug-transit countries that significantly affect the United States. A country’s presence on the list does not necessarily reflect its counternarcotics efforts or its level of cooperation on illegal drug control with the United States. The designation can reflect a combination of geographic, commercial, and economic factors that allow drugs to be produced and/or trafficked through a country.

When a country on the list does not fulfill its obligations under international counter-narcotics agreements and conventions, the President determines that the country has failed demonstrably to meet its counterdrug obligations, only Bolivia, Burma, and Venezuela, failed demonstrably. Such a designation can lead to sanctions. However, the President may also execute a waiver when he determines there is a vital national interest in continuing U.S. assistance. Even without such a waiver, humanitarian assistance and counternarcotics assistance may continue.

TCO

July 25, 2011 - President Obama has signed an Executive Order imposing sanctions against significant transnational criminal organizations (TCO's). The Order provides the United States with new tools to break the economic power of transnational organized crime and protect financial markets. It will assist the Administration’s efforts to disrupt, dismantle and defeat the TCO's that pose a significant threat to U.S. national security, foreign policy or the economy.

As a result of this Order, any property in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons in which the significant TCO's listed in the Annex have an interest is blocked, and U.S. persons are prohibited from engaging in transactions with them.

The Order also authorizes the U.S. Department of the Treasury, in consultation with the Departments of Justice and State, to identify for sanctions any individual or entity determined to have materially assisted, sponsored or provided financial, material or technological support for any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this Order.

The US encourage partners and allies to echo the commitment and join in building a new framework for international cooperation to protect all our citizens from the violence, harm and exploitation wrought by transnational organized crime.

In signing today’s Order, the President imposed sanctions on the following organizations listed:

More information on the Transnational Criminal Organizations page.


June 05, 2013 - Transnational Criminal Organizations Designations - Mara Salvatrucha Leaders aka MS13

The Mara Salvatrucha gang originated in Los Angeles and has spread to Central America, other parts of the United States, and Canada. It is commonly abbreviated as MS, Mara, and MS-13. There is some dispute about the etymology of the name. The most common belief is that the word "Mara" refers to the Spanish word for "gang", and "Salvatrucha" (which is Spanish slang) for "Salvadoran army ant". Alternatively, it is suggested that "Salvatrucha" refers to the Salvadoran peasant guerrillas, the source of much of the gang's early manpower. The number 13 is homage to the Los Angeles gang "Los Emes" or "The Ms"(M being the thirteenth letter of the alphabet). The gang was set up in Los Angeles in 1980's by Salvadoran immigrants in the city's Pico-Union neighborhood. Source: Urban Dictionary

Please visit this chart for more information on these designations.

The following individuals have been added to OFAC's SDN List: <sort> BERCIAN MANCHON, Moris Alexander (a.k.a. "EL BARNEY"); DOB 30 Oct 1984; POB San Salvador, El Salvador; nationality El Salvador (individual) [TCO]. CISNEROS RODRIGUEZ, Jose Misael (a.k.a. CISNEROS, Jose Misal; a.k.a. "HALF MILLION"; a.k.a. "MEDIO MLON"); DOB 02 Oct 1976; POB Agua Caliente, Chalatenango, El Salvador; nationality El Salvador (individual) [TCO]. HENRIQUEZ SOLORZANO, Borromeo Enrique (a.k.a. RIVERA ARIAS, Racson Mario; a.k.a. "EL DIABLITO"; a.k.a. "EL DIABLITO DE HOLLYWOOD"; a.k.a. "EL DIABLO"; a.k.a. "EL DIABLO PEQUENO"); DOB 27 Jul 1978; POB San Salvador, El Salvador; nationality El Salvador (individual) [TCO]. MONTERROSA-LARIOS, Marvin Geovanny (a.k.a. MONTERROSA-LARIOS, Marvin Jeovanny; a.k.a. "ENANO"); DOB 21 May 1974; POB San Miguel, San Miguel, El Salvador; nationality El Salvador (individual) [TCO]. RIVERA-LUNA, Moises Humberto (a.k.a. "SANTOS"; a.k.a. "VIEJO SANTOS"); DOB 23 May 1969; POB San Salvador, El Salvador; nationality El Salvador (individual) [TCO]. TURCIOS ANGEL, Saul Antonio (a.k.a. "EL TRECE"; a.k.a. "SHAYBOYS"); DOB 17 May 1978; POB Zaragoza, La Libertad, El Salvador; nationality El Salvador (individual) [TCO]. </sort> OFAC Recent Actions


July 25, 2011 - President Obama has signed an Executive Order imposing sanctions against significant transnational criminal organizations (TCO's). The Order provides the United States with new tools to break the economic power of transnational organized crime and protect financial markets. It will assist the Administration’s efforts to disrupt, dismantle and defeat the TCO's that pose a significant threat to U.S. national security, foreign policy or the economy.

As a result of this Order, any property in the United States or in the possession or control of U.S. persons in which the significant TCO's listed in the Annex have an interest is blocked, and U.S. persons are prohibited from engaging in transactions with them.

The Order also authorizes the U.S. Department of the Treasury, in consultation with the Departments of Justice and State, to identify for sanctions any individual or entity determined to have materially assisted, sponsored or provided financial, material or technological support for any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this Order.

The US encourage partners and allies to echo the commitment and join in building a new framework for international cooperation to protect all our citizens from the violence, harm and exploitation wrought by transnational organized crime.

In signing today’s Order, the President imposed sanctions on the following organizations listed:

More information on the Transnational Criminal Organizations page.

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