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Australia

January 10, 2013 - Australia imposes new sanctions on Iran

CANBERRA, Australia – Australia has expanded sanctions against Iran amid growing concerns over the country's suspected nuclear weapons program.

Foreign Minister Bob Carr said in a statement Thursday that the new sanctions affect the financial, trade, energy and transport sectors.

FOX News Item


August 21, 2012 - Australia imposes new sanctions on Iran

New autonomous sanctions in response to Iran’s continuing non-compliance with United Nations Security Council resolutions on its nuclear program and in response to the escalating violence and human rights abuses in Syria commenced on 21 August 2012. Autonomous Sanctions (Export Sanctioned Goods – Iran) Specification 2012

Australia is imposing new sanctions against Iran in a fresh effort to pressure it into abandoning its nuclear program. Foreign Minister Bob Carr says the new autonomous sanctions will restrict dealings with Iran's oil, gas, petroleum and financial sectors. They will also restrict trade in gold, precious metals, diamonds and new Iranian currency. "These sanctions aim to increase pressure on Iran to comply with nuclear non-proliferation obligations and with United Nations Security Council resolutions," Senator Carr said in a statement on Wednesday. Source: The Australian News Item


UN Based

On 27 December 2006, the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) adopted resolution 1737 (2006) imposing sanctions in relation to Iran in response to the proliferation risks presented by the Iranian nuclear program and, in this context, by Iran's continuing failure to meet the requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency Board of Governors and to comply with the provisions of Security Council resolution 1696 (2006). The sanctions were extended by UNSC resolutions 1747 (2007), 1803 (2008) and 1929 (2010).


On 4 August 2010, the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade specified 150 Iranian entities with which it is prohibited to do business without prior authorisation.

Iran Entities List

Australia Sanctions


Australia Based

December 06, 2011 - Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd on Tuesday said Australia's new measures targeted entities and individuals involved in Iran's ballistic missile and nuclear programmes, and underlined Canberra's mounting worries. "The measures will also further restrict business with Iran's petroleum and financial sectors," he said, without going into details.

(Source AFP)


On 29 July 2010, the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade announced new sanctions measures against Iran to support international efforts over Iran's nuclear ambitions. These new measures put Australia at the forefront of efforts to persuade Iran to reverse its current path of confrontation with the international community. They follow on from United Nations Security Council Resolution 1929 against Iran, adopted on 9 June.

On this page you will find details of Australia’s autonomous sanctions measures against Iran. These autonomous sanctions supplement United Nations Security Council sanctions against Iran.

Australia Sanctions

Canada

May 30, 2012 - Canada Further Tightens Sanctions on Iran - Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird issued the following statement

Canada’s grave and sincere concern over Iran’s nuclear program again compels us to act decisively.

In round after round of talks with both the International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA] and the P5+1 [the five permanent members of the UN Security Council and Germany], Iran has failed to engage meaningfully while the risk posed by its enrichment activities only increases.

The absence of progress with both the P5+1 and the IAEA leads Canada to ban, effective immediately, all imports to and exports from Iran. We are also adding a further 30 individuals and 82 entities to Canada’s list of designated persons under the Special Economic Measures Act.

Canada, like many of our closest allies, is making every possible effort to halt Iran’s reckless pursuit of their nuclear-weapons capabilities. The path of nuclear non-compliance will only bring further isolation for Ayatollah Khameini’s clerical, military dictatorship. We will continue to look for ways to reduce the negative impacts on the people of Iran, including humanitarian exemptions.”

Canada continues to support the P5+1 process. The group has worked patiently with Iran, in good faith, toward a peaceful and diplomatic solution to the nuclear question. To date, however, the regime has responded only with escalation and provocation, false promises and empty gestures. This was most recently the case following talks in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

The individuals and entities being listed today are believed to be engaged in activities that directly or indirectly facilitate, support, provide funding for or could contribute to Iran’s proliferation-sensitive nuclear activities, or are associates of, or are owned and controlled by, or acting on behalf of, such persons.

For more information, please see Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran).

Item 86 Schedule 1 to the Regulations is replaced by the following:

Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations is amended by adding the following after item 448: <sort> 449. Alaleh Kabud Kavir Company 450. AlBorz Investment Company 451. Amad Bahineh Saz Engineering Company 452. Andishe va Omran Mohit Company 453. Atomic Fuel Development Engineering Company (MATSA) 454. Azadegan Economic and Self-Reliance Company (also known as Minoo Industrial Group) 455. Baghyatollah Medical Sciences University (BMSU) (also known as Bagiatollah Medical Sciences University, Baghiatollah Medical Sciences University, Baqyatollah Medical Sciences University, Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Baqiatollah Medical Sciences University) 456. Baharestan Kish Company 457. Bahman Group 458. Bank Day 459. Bank Ghavamin 460. Bank Hekmat Iranian 461. Bank Sarmayeh 462. Behsaz Faraz Iranian Group 463. Bonyad Mostazafan Enghelab Eslami 464. Daniyan Pars Company 465. Esfahan Oil Refining 466. Esfahan Zinc Smelting Company 467. Explosion and Impact Technology Research Centre 468. Falazat Rangin Hirbed Company 469. Fanavaran Petrochemical 470. Fava Naft Saba Kish (also known as Fava Naft) 471. Hafiz Samaneh Company 472. Iran Air 473. Iran Atlas Kish Commercial and Industrial Company 474. Iran Atlas Kish Investment Company 475. Iran Industrial Development Investment Company 476. Iran Khodro Diesel 477. Iran Zinc Mines Development Company 478. Iranian Aluminum Company 479. Iranian Offshore Engineering and Construction Company 480. Iranian Venezuelan Bi-National Bank (IVBB) 481. Jey Oil Refining Company 482. Kermanshah Petrochemical Industries 483. Khargh Petrochemical 484. Kian Aliaj Company Kashan (also known as Kashan Alloy Company) 485. Kowsaran Institute 486. Mabna Niroo Moharake Company 487. Mahan Air 488. Misagh Basirat Institute 489. Mobarakeh Esfahan Steel Company 490. Mowj Nasr Gostar Communications and Electronics Company 491. Naftiran Intertrade Company Ltd. 492. Nikaroo Engineering Company 493. Ofogh Toseeh Saberin Engineering Company 494. Oil Exploration Operations Company 495. Oil Pension Fund Investment Company 496. Pardis Sabz Mellal Company 497. Pars Amayesh Sanaat Kish (also known as PASK, Vacuumkaran, Vacuum Karan and Vacuum Karan Co.) 498. Parsian Bank 499. Payuran Energy Development Institution 500. Pazuhan Pishroo Industrial Tehran 501. Pelasko Kar Saipa 502. Pishkasutan Saba Commercial Company (SPC) 503. Pishro Systems Research Company (also known as Pishro Company, Advanced Systems Research Company, ASRC, Center for Advanced Systems Research and CRAS) 504. Rayan Saipa 505. Saba Naft Engineering and Construction Group 506. Saba Naft Support Services Company 507. Saba Steel 508. Sadid Industrial Group 509. Sahand Naftiran Commercial Services Company 510. Saipa 511. Saipa Azin 512. Saipa Diesel 513. Samen AlAiemeh Credit Cooperative (also known as Samen Credit Cooperative) 514. Samen AlHujaj Credit Cooperative 515. Sepahan Oil Company 516. Sepehr Andishan Payab Company 517. Setad-e Ejraye Farman-e Emam 518. Shahab Sang Mineral Industries Company 519. Shahed Company 520. Shahid Mahallati Maritime Industries Institute 521. Shahriyar Mahestan Company 522. Tadbir Energy Group 523. Tadbir Investment Company 524. Talaeeyeh Commercial Company 525. Tehran Gostaresh Company (also known as Tehran Gostaresh Co. PJS) 526. Tek Yab Asia Company 527. Toos Gostar Urban Development Investment Company 528. Toseeh Etemad Investment Company 529. Zagros Steel Company 530. Zamyad </sort> Items 47 and 48 of Part 2 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations are repealed. Part 2 of Schedule 1 to the Regulations is amended by adding the following after item 52: <sort> 53. Abbas Askarzadeh 54. Abdulnasser Hemati 55. AhmadReza Khatibi 56. Ali Bakhshayesh 57. Ali Divandari 58. Ali Fadavi 59. Ali Hosynitash 60. Ali Soleimani Shayesteh 61. Ayatollah Ibrahimi 62. Babak Morteza Zanjani 63. Behzad Soltani 64. Ebrahim Mahmoudzadeh 65. Farshad Heydari 66. Ghorban Daniyali 67. Hossein Faghihian 68. Hossein Salami 69. Jaafar Jamali 70. Mashallah Azimi 71. Massoud AkhavanFard 72. Mohammad Ahmadian 73. Mohammad Farouzandeh 74. Mohammad Hassan Mohebbian Araghi 75. Mohammad Reza Pishroo 76. Mohammed Jaafar Mokhber Dezfooli 77. Mojtaba Haeri 78. Nasser Rastkhan 79. Parviz Fatah 80. Parviz Khaki 81. Ramin PahsayeeFam 82. Reza Karbashchi Khayabani 83. Seyed Zia Imani </sort> Canada Sanctions


November 21, 2011 - Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations - Whereas the Governor in Council is of the opinion that the situation in Iran constitutes a grave breach of international peace and security that has resulted or is likely to result in a serious international crisis; Therefore, His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, pursuant to subsections 4‍(1) to (3) of the Special Economic Measures Acta, hereby makes the annexed Regulations Amending the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Regulations. Canada Sanctions


On July 26, 2010, Prime Minister Harper made a statement announcing that Canada is imposing sanctions on Iran under the Special Economic Measures Act. These sanctions are in addition to existing sanctions passed under the United Nations Act.

Iran continues to violate its international obligations by ignoring successive UN Security Council resolutions to cooperate fully with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and suspend its enrichment-related activities.

Therefore, in close consultation with like-minded partners, including the United States and the European Union, and building upon UN Resolution 1929, the Government of Canada is implementing further sanctions against Iran through the Special Economic Measures Act (SEMA).

Sanctions prohibit all of the following:

In addition, the Special Economic Measures (Iran) Permit Authorization Order (SOR/2010-166), made pursuant to subsection 4(4) of the Special Economic Measures Act authorizes the Minister of Foreign Affairs to issue to any person in Canada or any Canadian outside Canada a permit to carry out a specified activity or transaction, or any class of activity or transaction, that is restricted or prohibited pursuant to the Regulations.

Canada Sanctions

Hong Kong

March 25, 2011 - United Nations Sanctions Ordinance - UN Based Sanctions


March 25, 2011 - Hong Kong Passes Iran Sanctions Law, Freezes IRISL Assets

The new laws, which went into effect last week (March 25, 2011), impose asset freezes and travel bans on Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines, or IRISL, for allegedly aiding an Iranian weapons program. Iran has long said it is not pursuing nuclear weapons.

"The amended regulations update existing sanctions against Iran to implement decisions of the United Nations Security Council under Resolution 1929," a government spokeswoman told AFP.


May 13, 2008 - United Nations Sanctions (Iran) (Amendment) Regulation 2008 Hong Kong Sanctions - UN based sanctions.

Japan

March 13, 2012 - Additional Accompanying Measures pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution on Iran - Termination of Correspondent Banking Relationships with Bank Tejarat

In connection with Iran’s nuclear issue, the Government of Japan has been implementing a series of measures against Iran’s nuclear activities based on the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions 1737, 1747, 1803 and 1929.

Japan is deeply concerned about the current state of Iran’s nuclear issue in which, contrary to the series of resolutions of the UNSC and the IAEA Board of Governors, Iran continues and expands its enrichment activities. In light of these current situation over the Iranian nuclear issue, the Government of Japan has decided to add the following measure, based on the Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Act (hereinafter to be referred to as “the Foreign Exchange Act”), in line with the Cabinet approval on March 13, 2012, “Additional Accompanying Measures pursuant to UNSC resolution on Iran”, so as to contribute to the international efforts for the international peace.

Termination of Correspondent Banking Relationships with Designated Banks through Asset Freeze. An Iranian bank (Annex) which could contribute to Iran’s proliferation-sensitive activities or the development of nuclear weapon delivery systems are designated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Notice (issued on March 13, 2012), and their assets are frozen based on the Foreign Exchange Act, with the effect that correspondent banking relationships with those banks are halted.

21 Iranian banks are now designated by the relevant UNSC resolutions and Accompanying Measures pursuant to UNSC resolution.

(*The foregoing is a provisional translation. The date indicated above denotes the date of issue of the original press release in Japanese.)

Japan Sanctions


December 09, 2011 - In connection with the Iranian nuclear issue, the Government of Japan has been implementing a series of measures against Iran's nuclear activities based on United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions 1737, 1747, 1803 and 1929.

In light of the current situation over the Iranian nuclear issue, such as the adoption of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors' Resolution (issued on November 18, 2011) on Iran's Nuclear Issue that expressed deep and increasing concerns regarding the outstanding issues of Iran's nuclear program, the Government of Japan decided to add the following measures, based on the Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Act (hereinafter to be referred to as "the Foreign Exchange Act"), in line with the Cabinet approval on December 9, 2011, "Additional Accompanying Measures pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution on Iran", so as to contribute to the international efforts for the international peace.

As the other measures on Iran, in response to the statement* (issued on October 28, 2011) of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) which is an inter-governmental body comprised of 34 member jurisdictions and regional organizations, the Government of Japan advises financial institutions to scrutinize customer identifications, to file reports with the authorities upon detection of any suspicious transactions, and to notify about the foreign exchange transaction as required by the Act on Prevention of Transfer of Criminal Proceeds.

New Zealand

Article 41 of the United Nations Charter authorises the Security Council to take enforcement measures not involving the use of force in order to give effect to its decisions. These measures often take the form of sanctions. UN Security Council sanctions are binding on all UN member States, including New Zealand, and are implemented in New Zealand law by regulations made under the United Nations Act 1946. All persons and entities in New Zealand, and in many cases New Zealand citizens and companies overseas, must comply with regulations implementing Security Council sanctions. The range of sanctions imposed by the Security Council has included comprehensive economic and trade sanctions as well as more targeted measures such as arms embargoes, travel bans, and financial restrictions. Financial restrictions, otherwise known as an “assets freeze” are one of the most commonly used sanctions imposed by the United Nations Security Council. New Zealand Sanctions

Singapore

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